The Devil to pay

what is truth said jesting pilate and would not stay for an answer

35 notes

There were a few diversions, however, particularly the evening meetings of the savants who would later organize the Institut d’Égypte. Bonaparte took these meetings seriously and made his generals and staff attend. He could not always control such a diverse crowd, however. Several officers were unimpressed and obviously bored with scholarly discussions. A participant claimed Lannes and Junot were the worst behaved, joking with each other and making rude remarks while the savants attempted to educate them. Junot would deliberately mispronounce Lannes’s name as one of his better jokes, calling him l’âne, or ass. Lannes told Bonaparte that nobody could hear the scholars over Junot’s snores rumbling from the back of the crowded gathering. Bonaparte excused Junot from further sessions, but he made Lannes stay, fidgety, bored, with no one to listen his sotto voce comments.

Margaret S. Chrisawn, The Emperor’s Friend: Marshal Jean Lannes. (via valinaraii)

Madame Chrisawn is actually on Tumblr if my memory serves correct, she’s probably staying 100000 miles away from us heathens though.

(via jean-de-dieu-soult)

Actually, I’m right here with you folks.  Where else would I be except in the middle of a bunch of irreverent and highly educated people who know how much fun we can have with all these Napoleonic icons?  Some of them have been on pedestals far too long, dont’cha think?  Well, not Jean—I’ve spent a lot of time rescuing him from relative obscurity back in the day.  

(via maggiec70)

I feel like my life on tumblr and among the history folk has suddenly flashed in front of my eyes. 

(via maggiec70)

Filed under This is amazing however and I'm just going to reblog this story again because look at it

7 notes

http://lediableaquatre.tumblr.com/post/83664624778/larissamousseline

larissamousseline:

larissamousseline:

http://lediableaquatre.tumblr.com/post/83660992536/larissamousseline-hay-algo-de-felipe-ii-que-me

larissamousseline:

Hay algo de Felipe II que me deja loca: su manera de hablar sobre los Autos de Fe en las cartas a sus hijas desde Lisboa.

Lo normal sería que sus…

And his letter to Catherine de Medici about the massacre of St. Bartholomew.

My mind: WTF? XD, he was really fascinating.

I don’t know that one.

I’m not sure I want to.

What does he say?

7 notes

larissamousseline:

http://lediableaquatre.tumblr.com/post/83660992536/larissamousseline-hay-algo-de-felipe-ii-que-me         

larissamousseline:

Hay algo de Felipe II que me deja loca: su manera de hablar sobre los Autos de Fe en las cartas a sus hijas desde Lisboa.

Lo normal sería que sus frases reflejasen un odio intenso o que tuviese una actitud seria pero…

imageimage

Como el que va a ver una película al cine xD…

lediableaquatre
Yes, you are right, but his way to write about the autos is really curious and “funny”. He wasn’t cruel (or serio) when was writing about the autos. “Ooooh, the auto of yesterday was really boring, my beloved daughters” in that regard. It makes me laugh. Off-topic: My mobile is a shit xD.

Oh but he’s always a bit like that. Remember when he’s like “aw yes, Madalena (Ruiz) says she’s going to kill Luis Tristan but she’s probably drunk, tomorrow she won’t remember”

7 notes

larissamousseline:

Hay algo de Felipe II que me deja loca: su manera de hablar sobre los Autos de Fe en las cartas a sus hijas desde Lisboa.

Lo normal sería que sus frases reflejasen un odio intenso o que tuviese una actitud seria pero…

imageimage

Como el que va a ver una película al cine xD :S, en fin, pobres herejes, mi rubio tenía su propia parte chunga.

But the point is that it sort of was. An Auto de Fé was not, unlike what some people think, a show of torture. It was a religious ceremony and it wasn’t really seen as something cruel or sadistic, mostly because the Auto in itself didn’t really had anything special apart from the trial. That’s why a lot of Autos actually took during special religious days. As he says in the letter, there was a procession, and a sermon, and then the “trial”. Philip never stayed for the actual burning which happened afterward. He didn’t attend them and many of them were not really public ceremonies (I believe, unless the person to be burned was well known and an example was to be made.).

80 notes

valinaraii:

When they are together, although there are many people around, they do not notice anyone else; they talk and laugh, and nothing else distracts them.
Carlos V, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain, and his wife Isabel de Portugal. This is a copy painted by Rubens of the original by Titian, lost in the fire that destroyed Madrid’s Alcazar in 1734. Carlos commissioned the painting in 1548. Their marriage had been a happy one, and the emperor was devastated when, on May 1, 1539, she died after giving birth to a stillborn child. Her (most recent) biographer Alvar Ezquerra describes the scene of her death: 

In the moment she ceased to breathe, he kissed her face and her hands. She was still warm. And he started to cry. Those who were present could not tear him apart from the corpse, which he embraced with infinite despair, so they had to use the force, “without repairing in his imperial dignity”. While this dramatic scene took place, he exclaimed, not wanting to be separated from her: “Leave me, for I have lost my beloved one! ”

 
(Translation is mine, so beware of the possible mistakes)
Carlos never remarried, dressing in black the rest of his life. 

valinaraii:

When they are together, although there are many people around, they do not notice anyone else; they talk and laugh, and nothing else distracts them.

Carlos V, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain, and his wife Isabel de Portugal. This is a copy painted by Rubens of the original by Titian, lost in the fire that destroyed Madrid’s Alcazar in 1734. Carlos commissioned the painting in 1548. Their marriage had been a happy one, and the emperor was devastated when, on May 1, 1539, she died after giving birth to a stillborn child. Her (most recent) biographer Alvar Ezquerra describes the scene of her death:

In the moment she ceased to breathe, he kissed her face and her hands. She was still warm. And he started to cry. Those who were present could not tear him apart from the corpse, which he embraced with infinite despair, so they had to use the force, “without repairing in his imperial dignity”. While this dramatic scene took place, he exclaimed, not wanting to be separated from her: “Leave me, for I have lost my beloved one! ”

 

(Translation is mine, so beware of the possible mistakes)

Carlos never remarried, dressing in black the rest of his life. 

(via calonari)

Filed under He didn't go the funeral. Felipe had to preside over it