The Devil to pay

Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira les aristocrates à la lanterne! Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira les aristocrates on les pendra!

548 notes

ghosthamlet:

imperiatrix:

horatio waits very patiently for hamlet to stop talking to the skull

so this is where i have placed my affections he thinks

 (x)

(via daemonrolling)

54 notes

joachimmurat:

turnerslight:

Paul Delaroche, Napoleon in his study, 1841, Bordeaux, 34x25,8 cm, oil on canvas

The gesture that one can see on this image by Delaroche is often refered to as “typical” for Napoleon I. It was said that he suffered from bad stomach pain and that that’s the reason for putting his hand into the waistcoat. As funny as it is to think of him as being grumpy with bellyache it’s not true. 

The “hand in the waistcoat” actually belongs to the political iconography and is a sign of rhetorical strength. It comes from the ancient Roman rhetorical doctrine and stresses the ability of the speaker to make his point without depending on gesture. Napoleon adapted this ‘symbol’ the moment he left his military position and became Consul to show his skills as a politician.

I just thought it was because his pants didn’t have pockets.

Filed under ah!

42 notes

viverobespierre:

connor1401:

Assassin’s Creed Unity - Historical Persons
ROBESPIERRE
Date of Birth: 1758Personality: Known as “The Incorruptible.” Highly fastidious and obsessive. Not a great orator, but persuasive in the breadth and depth of his ideas. Ruthless and determined in pursuing his goals. Eventually rather paranoid (as almost everyone became during the Terror). A gentleman and man of culture, and even a little bit of a dandy. In his habits and manner of life he was simple and laborious; he was not a man gifted with flashes of genius, but one who had to think much before he could come to a decision. Worked extremely hard.Skills: Persuasion.Profession: Lawyer. Committee of Public Safety.Affilitation: Templars.Background: Came from a bourgeois family of lawyers in Arras. Rose in provincial politics and was elected as a deputy of the Third Estate from his region. Increasing became radicalized and sought support from working class Parisians. Eventually dominated the extreme left that was supported by the Sans Culottes.
 

oh jesus here we go
Actually this isn’t terrible!
The only real issue I have is with the idea that he “was not a man gifted with flashes of genius etc etc etc…” Not really sure how thinking about a solution automatically makes you less brilliant than someone who jumps to conclusions? But wow they’re not making him into Hitler or even a dictator, so that’s something! 
(tagging bunniesandbeheadings because I have no idea if she’s seen this yet) 

I’m hoping that they don’t turn Louis and Marie Antoinette into the villains tlhough because if we’re going to have another ACIII, I’m throwing the towel.

viverobespierre:

connor1401:

Assassin’s Creed Unity - Historical Persons

ROBESPIERRE

Date of Birth: 1758

Personality: Known as “The Incorruptible.” Highly fastidious and obsessive. Not a great orator, but persuasive in the breadth and depth of his ideas. Ruthless and determined in pursuing his goals. Eventually rather paranoid (as almost everyone became during the Terror). A gentleman and man of culture, and even a little bit of a dandy. In his habits and manner of life he was simple and laborious; he was not a man gifted with flashes of genius, but one who had to think much before he could come to a decision. Worked extremely hard.

Skills: Persuasion.

Profession: Lawyer. Committee of Public Safety.

Affilitation: Templars.

Background: Came from a bourgeois family of lawyers in Arras. Rose in provincial politics and was elected as a deputy of the Third Estate from his region. Increasing became radicalized and sought support from working class Parisians. Eventually dominated the extreme left that was supported by the Sans Culottes.

 

oh jesus here we go

Actually this isn’t terrible!

The only real issue I have is with the idea that he “was not a man gifted with flashes of genius etc etc etc…” Not really sure how thinking about a solution automatically makes you less brilliant than someone who jumps to conclusions? But wow they’re not making him into Hitler or even a dictator, so that’s something! 

(tagging bunniesandbeheadings because I have no idea if she’s seen this yet) 

I’m hoping that they don’t turn Louis and Marie Antoinette into the villains tlhough because if we’re going to have another ACIII, I’m throwing the towel.

(via his-name-was-writ-in-water)

Filed under i was so disappointed with ACIII black and white view of the civil war

1 note

You know, there’s some people in my dash who deeply annoy me sometimes and my deepest desire is that I annoy them too.

6 notes

September 30, 1956

Donitz’s last day.

For a moment we sat side by side in silence, staring into space. Suddenly I heard Donitz saying in a cutting voice, “Because of you I’ve lost these eleven years. You’re to blame for it all. That I was indicted like a common criminal. What did I have to do with politics? Bu for you Hitler would never have had the idea of making me chief of state. All my men have commands again. But look at me! Like a criminal. My career is wrecked.” He stood up, stared hard at me and went on with the same hostile tone. “One more question. Was that remark about Kranzbuhler your last word? Kranzbuhler is leading the whole operation in behalf of those condemned for war crimes. He often sees Adenauer. And I have some influence too. After my release I want to be able to say, ‘Let the four in Spandau go free’. Am I to restrict it to ‘Let three of them go free?”

I shook my head. “I don’t mind you speaking of all four. But perhaps you have a moment to listen to what I have to say?”

Donitz made a permissive gesture and said tersely, “By all means.”

“For ten years here you have slandered, disparaged, and ostracized me. Long ago, Neurath advised me to ignore that, simply to keep silent. Imprisonment itself was bad enough, he said. I followed that advice. Even though you constantly blamed me for having acted dishonourably during the last months of the war and in the Nuremberg Trial. But at least once I want you to hear this: You and the others here have endlessly talked about honour. Every other word you and Schirach utters is dignity, bearing. This war killed millions of people. More millions were murdered in the camps by those criminals. All of us here were part of the regime. But your ten years here perturb you more than the fifty million dead. And your last words here in Spandau are: your career! No, I don’t want anything from you and your Kranzbuhler. Of course I want to get out of here. But if it depends on that, I d’rather stay here for another ten years.

Albert Speer, Spandau’s Secret diaries. (via lediableaquatre)

Filed under rebbloging for reasons