The Devil to pay

Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira les aristocrates à la lanterne! Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira les aristocrates on les pendra!

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Every day I learn anew how inhuman we really were. (…) The absolute dominion of utilitarian ends, such as I pursued as minister of armaments, is nothing but a form of inhumanity. The American soldiers who guard us are coal miners, oil drillers, farm laborers. The rules call for rigorous standards of guarding, but these men always balance the rigor by kindness. John, a miner from Pennsylvania, has actually become something of a friend. It is striking that the Negro Americans soldiers were the first to overcome the barrier of hostility. Partly on the basis of their own experiences, they seemed to regard us as underdogs who deserve pity. Even more impressive was the behaviour of several Jewish doctors. Even Streicher, who was despised by almost everyone, including us, his fellow defedants, received support from them far beyond the measure imposed by their duty as physicians.
Albert Speer, The Spandau Diaries.

Filed under the-uniformium Albert Speer racism nuremberg trails well mostly post nuremberg not with Streicher though

1 note

Albert Speer saying that the afro-American prison guards were amongst the nicest guards to the prisioners though.

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poniatowskaja:

More art about the Polish partitions (first part here)

1) Daniel Chodowiecki in 1781, depicting the Austrian partition. (x)

2) ‘Die Inbesitznahme der polnischen Länder durch Friedrich II’ also called ‘Polen und Friedrich II’ by Bernhard Rode, 1796 (x)

3) ‘The Polish Plumb Cake’ by John Lodge, published in September 1774 in The Westminster Magazine. I tried to find this when I was doing the previous post but the only version I could find then was it used as a book cover. The interesting thing about this one is the inclusion of France, which was not a direct partitioning party, though it did benefit from the partitions in the Napoleonic wars, and did not act to prevent them. (x)

Filed under I love how the devil just randomly appears

24 notes

vfreie:

grenadierfifer:

Characters that share the same personality type as you.

obsessivebehavior:

soviczka:

If you don’t know your personality type, take this test.

Rules: Find out what characters share the same personality type as you here and list the characters that you find relevant below. Then tag five friends and let them know you tagged them!

Oh my this thing… time to get proud of letting people be rude to me without punching them later for it being ISFP.

• Jake from Adventure Time
• Pumbaa from The Lion King
• Tracy from Pokémon
• Fluttershy from My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic
• Mr. Bingley from Pride and Prejudice
• Fantine from Les Misérables
• Nightcrawler from X-Men
• The Dude from The Big Lebowski

~

I tag these dear souls: batbiscuit, vfreie, yourfutureleader, tarakau, le-aki

Have fun guys~

The test machine spat out an ISTJ profile result so here we go:

  • Dr. Kelso from Scrubs
  • Rei Ayanami from Neon Genesis Evangelion
  • Aleksej Karenin ( lediableaquatre look and lol)
  • Darth Vader from Star Wars
  • The Terminator
  • Girodelle from Rose of Versailles
  • Ninotchka
  • Rolf from Ed, Edd n Eddy

…I am pleased.

I knew there was a reason I liked you :D

Filed under awww Alexey... why is Alexey paired up with Darth Vader though

134,190 notes

redrum-my-dear:

stem-cell:

rosalarian:

pourquoi-nutmeg:

nortonism:

The thing about this is that sculptures like these in art history were for the male gaze. Photoshop a phone to it and suddenly she’s seen as vain and conceited. That’s why I’m 100% for selfie culture because apparently men can gawk at women but when we realize how beautiful we are we’re suddenly full of ourselves…

YES.

Girls don’t let anyone tell you loving yourself is vanity.

“You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting “Vanity,” thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for you own pleasure.” ― John Berger, Ways of Seeing

"Sculptures like that were for the male gaze". Are you serious? Like, for real? Have you got any notion of art history at all or are you just arbitrarily applying today’s views to the classical world because hey, it’s Tumblr?

Sculptures like that were for the male gaze. Hum, yes. It’s not as though most famous sculptures are of men (David for once). It’s not as though most famous sculptures are of religious themes (pietà). Also have you ever looked at Bernini? 
Not to mention of course that most sculptures that regard classical theme have men as their object because of the whole male beauty and Antiquity theme. (Depictions of Gods and heroes for instance).
John Berger obviously forgot that in his haste to speak about the “feminine” that many artists that sculpted and painted were not really interested in the female body. Lol, awkward.

redrum-my-dear:

stem-cell:

rosalarian:

pourquoi-nutmeg:

nortonism:

The thing about this is that sculptures like these in art history were for the male gaze. Photoshop a phone to it and suddenly she’s seen as vain and conceited. That’s why I’m 100% for selfie culture because apparently men can gawk at women but when we realize how beautiful we are we’re suddenly full of ourselves…

YES.

Girls don’t let anyone tell you loving yourself is vanity.

“You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting “Vanity,” thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for you own pleasure.” ― John Berger, Ways of Seeing

"Sculptures like that were for the male gaze". Are you serious? Like, for real? Have you got any notion of art history at all or are you just arbitrarily applying today’s views to the classical world because hey, it’s Tumblr?

Sculptures like that were for the male gaze. Hum, yes. It’s not as though most famous sculptures are of men (David for once). It’s not as though most famous sculptures are of religious themes (pietà). Also have you ever looked at Bernini? 

Not to mention of course that most sculptures that regard classical theme have men as their object because of the whole male beauty and Antiquity theme. (Depictions of Gods and heroes for instance).

John Berger obviously forgot that in his haste to speak about the “feminine” that many artists that sculpted and painted were not really interested in the female body. Lol, awkward.

(Source: nevver)